21st Century Environmental Explorers

The Aquafriends - STARSKY & HUTCH

You can follow Starsky and Hutch cross the world educating kids everywhere on their facebook page.
https://www.facebook.com/martin.hutchinson.94

This guy (Hutch) and his dog (STARSKY) have been riding around the world on his bike to inform people and raise awareness about environmental pollution and clean up all over the world.

As an environmental activist has been cycling through Europe to highlight the damage mankind is doing to the natural world. Martin Hutchinson has spent 12 years walking, cycling and making his case to whoever will listen.

He wants to galvanize ordinary people into putting pressure on their governments to stop the dumping of waste in particular. The starkest example, he says, is the unprocessed rubbish being tipped by the truckload into the Amazon River.

We all need to be aware of the impact we have on the natural world. If we don’t the long-term consequences will be very severe, said Martin

“They are just dumping rubbish into the Amazon four times a day and this has been going on for 20 years and nobody’s doing anything about it,” he said.

“We live on a most incredible planet but we’re not doing enough to protect it.

“For instance, everyone talks about protecting the Amazon but nobody’s doing anything to stop the damage.”

Martin says his journey has not been without hardship and he has been attacked three times, one of those with an axe, but he is not put off and is determined to continue.

He has set up a petition at https://goo.gl/Wm2JV7 in the hope of raising awareness and pressuring government bodies to act, and hopes EWN readers will join the campaign.

Briton embarks on World Environment Tour to promote conservation

BY CARRIE-MARIE BRATLEY, IN NEWS · 09-02-2017 13:38:00 · 0 COMMENTS

A British environmentalist is currently in Portugal on the second leg of a World Environment Tour which has seen him walk 21 countries over nine years in Latin America, and will now see him cycle from the UK to Australia.

Briton embarks on World Environment Tour to promote conservation

Martin Hutchinson’s goal is to raise awareness about and help fight local causes affecting the places through which his travels take him, as well as raising awareness about environmental issues affecting the world at large.
During his travels he gives speeches at schools, universities and companies, to address local and global causes. He has been actively involved with organising and taking part in many clean ups around the world as well as participating in protests.
“The human race is deteriorating”, he says, adding; “there is so much going on that is destroying the planet.”
The 55-year-old campaigner who was born in Llandovery, Wales, previously spent nine years walking 34,000 kilometres through 21 Latin American countries, where he visited some 600 schools and universities to give talks.
“I purposely decided to walk to get the message across to people to try and slow down and take in the things that are happening around them”, he tells The Portugal News.
Following a brief stop in the UK upon his return, the former carpenter took up his cause again last May and set off from Manchester on what he terms ‘Part 2’ of his World Environment Tour, this time on a recumbent bicycle.
He arrived in Portugal three weeks ago and has already been received by a number of schools and councils in the region. He plans to cycle up to Lisbon and northern Portugal, before crossing on into Spain and beyond.
While in Portugal, the activist will be taking part in upcoming demonstrations such as an anti-fracking protest to be staged in Lisbon, on 27 February, and a protest against the levelling of wetlands in Lagoa (Algarve) this coming Sunday.
Martin Hutchinson, who has been globetrotting since his late teens, says he is “impressed” with how clean Portugal is, but was dismayed to see how dense concrete construction is “destroying local culture.”
Part 2 of the conservationist’s World Tour will take him through 44 European countries before crossing into Asia, and ending in Australia; a tour he expects could take another nine years.
“I’ve been attacked a few times but I’m still here so I’m not too worried”, he says about crossing through potentially problematic areas on his journey; “I think when people see the bicycle they are so curious that it breaks down any hostility.”